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Hate To Tell You, But You Can Get Ticks On Your Junk

If you're someone that likes to hang out in the woods, and you have man parts, you should probably watch out.

This was something I've never heard about, but it makes perfect sense. According to Shilpi Argawal, MD, a DC-area family medicine physician, when speaking with Men's Health, it's noted that “Ticks like warm, creased areas that protect and cover them: armpits, behind the thigh, and the lower abdomen."

Well, that also means near the testicles.

So, if you want to keep those little suckers off your junk, here's a few tips that Men's Health suggests you use:

 

Groom It Up:

Keep the area clean, and probably trim it up. You don't have to clear the woods out down there, but at the very least, make the forest more of a park to limit the hiding spots.

 

Give Your Clothes The Treatment:

If you're going out into the wild, put on some bug spray/permethrin. BUT DON'T - I REPEAT, DON'T SPRAY YOUR JUNK WITH THESE CHEMICALS.

Pull Your Socks Up:

Ticks like to grab onto whatever they can to travel with you. Be sure to keep your skin as protected from tall grass as possible.

 

Compression Shorts Or Under Armor Is Your Friend:

Sure, wearing tighter boxers, compression shorts, or some form of underclothes might make you feel bulky or hotter than you want to be, but what would you rather have? Be warm, or have something nibbling at your nubs?

 

Always Check Your Jewels When You Get Home:

Do a thorough check. Look at every foldable crevice, including the balls, and make sure to shower just in case.

 

In the event of finding a tick, balls or otherwise, Men's Health shares the CDC's ruling for removal: 

"Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible; pull upward with steady, even pressure, and thoroughly clean the bite area with rubbing alcohol, iodine scrub or soap and water.

You should then submerse the live tick in rubbing alcohol, place it in a sealed bag, or flush it down the toilet. Pay attention to your health over the following weeks, and see a doctor if you develop a fever, headache, fatigue and/or rash."

How to properly remove a tick

University of Manitoba tick expert Kateryn Rochon explains the proper way to remove a tick. Find out about the blacklegged tick and what makes it unique: http://youtu.be/RTt8R-6y69Q